Jump to content


Photo

Crossbows


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Whitetiger

Whitetiger

    Totally Addicted

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,271 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:allentown PA

Posted 02 February 2011 - 10:23 AM

How do you pick one? With my herniated disc between c6 & 7, my left tricep is weak and I have 2 numb fingers. I cant draw a bow at 60 lbs. Its been a month now since I hut myself. Im pretty much writing off bow hunting again and now instead of a PSE Bow Madness bow I was going to buy Im looking into a crossbow now that it's medically neccessary. I was looking at the Barnett wildcat c5 or parker buck buster hp165. Im trying to stay at the $399.99 mark since I'll have to get all the other gear for it like bolts, case.......ect.....

#2 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 February 2011 - 12:29 PM

I have a PSE Viper Rattler crossbow. It seems to shoot well enough for me at age 68 almost 69. I would encourage you to visit a shop where you can shoot one and see what fits you best. My second choice was going to be a Excalibur just because it is not a compound and has less to go wrong. I also would not go below 150 lbs. Mine is as I recall 165 lbs and normal archery backstops cannot even slow the arrow so a special target will be required. With your physical problems at present you must look into a draw assist device. There are two basic devices 1 a rope device and 2 a crank device. Some of the higher priced crossbows may even have a crank device built into them. My PSE did not come with a draw assist device but I bought the rope device and although it cuts the draw weight in half I must pull about 80 lbs till it is drawn and locked. The effort is not like drawing a vertical bow but more like bending over and picking something up using both hands. Extreme care must be observed when drawing the bow as both limbs must be drawn equally to effect a good shot. There is a little learning curve to shooting a crossbow but nothing like learning the ropes of archery. If you can shoot a rifle a crossbow will come pretty much naturally. One of the best pieces of advice is to keep your fingers well below the line of travel of the string as with the power of a crossbow you will take the ends of those digits right off.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#3 Spirithawk

Spirithawk

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,343 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 February 2011 - 07:22 PM

I have a 175lb draw Horton Legend XL. It's a bear to draw even with the rope device that Paul gave me. I have to sit down, hook up the rope and lay back as I draw. Perosnally I have nothing against Barnett but I have heard a lot of bad things about them. With your kind of problems what ever you buy I'd get one with a crank drawing device. Might cost a bit more but you'll be glad that you did. Paul gave you some good advice. one thing i'll add, that I learned the hard way, is that if you have a scope on it you need to remember that your arrow sits much lower than the scope. That is important in that you need to be aware of any close branches in line with the arrow. looking through the scope alone you won't see them!

Horton Legend XL;

Posted Image

Edited by Spirithawk, 02 February 2011 - 07:26 PM.


#4 Geoff / TBow

Geoff / TBow

    Always Here

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 487 posts

Posted 02 February 2011 - 08:23 PM

There are basically two types of crossbows. Compound units and recurve prod xbows. The primary advantage / disadvantage (depending on your preference) is that the axle-to-axle width of a compound xbow is narrower than the tip-to-tip width of a recurve prod xbow. That may have a bearing on your hunting style where the density of the brush or tree branches might demand a smaller bow.

Both types will send a significantly deadly bolt / arrow wherever you aim it as long as you master the peculiarities of the xbow style of shooting.

Excalibur is considered the leader in the recurve prod style of xbows, but there are a few more companies making that type of weapon. Their simplistic design is one of the positive features. IMHO, the compound crossbows have far too may parts, which could spell problems if you're in the woods or on a hunting trip far from home and gidgets and gadgets start breaking or failing. That's not to say they will, it's just a matter of the law of averages. I've always believed in the KISS principle, but I do shoot a compound bow as opposed to a recurve or a longbow, so that might just shoot that all to heck I guess.

Xbows in the 165 to 175 lb range will take any big game animal in North America. My son shoots an older Excalibur Exocet at 175 lbs and has taken 4 moose, a couple black bears and a couple whitetails with his, not to mention a bunch of small game. My son uses the rope pulley system to load his bow. It has two advantages. One, it eases the strain on the muscles. And two, it loads the bow to the exact same spot with regards to the string being loaded left or right of the locking system which will translate into your bolts shooting consistantly. Those that aspire to the heavier poundage xbows are more for braggin' than being more efficient IMHO. A 40 to 50 yard shot with a xbow is a long shot, much the same as it is for a bow. Under 30 yards is more realistic.

Some of the older xbows used to shoot a short bolt in the 16" to 18" length and are far too short for me. I'd recommend a xbow that can shoot a 21" to 23" bolt / arrow for increased energy.

Sights are personal preference, but I've noticed a lot of xbow shooters are opting for a scope. Definately do not use a scope over 4X as most targets are going to be less than 30 yards. Most of the scopes marketed by xbow companies will also have graduated crosshairs for your selected yardages.

I was aware, as Spirithawk had mentioned, that Barnett had some issues with their xbows, but I think that was derived from the days of the old Barnett Wildcat and Commando models from the 70s era. They were, IMO, crap. I do however think that they've come a long way since the 70s, but I am unable to speak from experience on their latest models.

10Point seem to be the leader in compound xbows while Excalibur are the front runner in the recurve xbow catagory. But to get the best in their class, you'll likely also find that there's a price to pay for that.

Best of luck in your search.

Geoff / TBow
Every day you`re fortunate enough to wake up breathing, is cause for celebration!

#5 Whitetiger

Whitetiger

    Totally Addicted

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,271 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:allentown PA

Posted 15 February 2011 - 09:30 AM

With my budget ($400), Im choosing Parker Crossbow's Buck Buster HP 165. How do you tell what length bolt to use?



#6 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 February 2011 - 10:37 AM

As I stated before I have a PSE. What surprised me was the rating of this bow as compared to the other low end offerings. It would be within your budget limitations. I do not know anyone that owns a Parker bow but from what I have read there seem to be mixed reviews with the Parker line. My crossbow came with arrows and I call them arrows as they are identical to those shot from standard archery equipment except for wall thickness and length. The actual length of arrow is dependant on the overall length of the crossbow and the length of thrust of the string. Keep in mind that you will be using broadheads and need the arrow length to accomplish this. In a crossbow the arrow lays in a groove on the rail and must extend a little beyond the end of the rail to accomodate the broadhead. I cannot at the moment give you a length that Parker recommends but the instruction booklet that comes with the crossbow I amsure will tell you the answer to your question.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#7 Spirithawk

Spirithawk

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,343 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 February 2011 - 12:49 PM

One thing to keep in mind is that the weight of your arrow, with broadhead, is every bit as important as the length. With the heavy poundage of a crossbow, too light an arrow can have disaterous results damaging both the bow and yourself. If you buy a new bow all the needed info should be in the instruction booklet that comes with it just as Paul said. Any questions about the bow you choose, if not answered there, can easily be answered by a simple call to the manufacturer of your bow. I bought mine used so I gave Horton a call and they were happy to answer all my questions. That was a phone call that more than payed for itself. Crossbows aren't the killing machines that non-crossbow shooters think they are. They are quite lethal but have their own set of draw backs just like any other weapon. Keep your rail lubed and your string waxed, practice just like with any bow, and you'll do well. One other thing about arrows, if shooting carbons keep a close eye on the shafts for splintering and cracks. With the extreme thrust from a crossbow that is much more important than on verticle bows.

#8 TerryfromAR

TerryfromAR

    Hunting Resource

  • Moderators
  • 1,608 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texarkana, TX
  • Interests:Hunting, fishing, spending time with my kids and wife, anything that gets me out of the house especially pertaining to my outdoor persuits. computers, technology, movies,

Posted 15 February 2011 - 01:55 PM

Something I haven't seen on here that I might interject would be to mark on either side of the rail on the center serving in either white out pen, or black permanent marker. (Depending on color of the center serving my x-bow initially came with a yellow center serving, and the replacement strings had black center servings.) This way if you somehow do not pull the string back straight, you know it before you fire, so you don't re-sight in error. I love my x-bow and killed my first deer ever with it. I am 30 years old now and I got it for my 17th birthday. It's a 150lb draw Horton Stag that was origonally set up for 17" bolts, but the 20 inch fly much better. I can promise you making the transition to crossbow is one you will very soon come to terms with, and be glad you did. Not for the reason you made the transition but the fact that you are moving to a new piece of equipment that will serve you well.
Semper Fi

#9 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 February 2011 - 06:09 PM

I believe my arrows are only 17 inches long. They are aluminum arrows and are 2216s. I cannot see them fly at 20 yds so you will need someone to watch the flight of the arrow. At 20 yds they will get there in a big hurry and mine hit straight on at that distance.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#10 TerryfromAR

TerryfromAR

    Hunting Resource

  • Moderators
  • 1,608 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Texarkana, TX
  • Interests:Hunting, fishing, spending time with my kids and wife, anything that gets me out of the house especially pertaining to my outdoor persuits. computers, technology, movies,

Posted 15 February 2011 - 06:32 PM

Paul, I shot a small doe (my first deer) at 20 yds with my crossbow, and it went through so fast I thought I had missed when I saw the dirt fly behind the deer.
Semper Fi




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users