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#1 Shrapnal

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 08:54 AM

one of the first things I'm going to hunt after my course is done, are those dang coyotes. We are going to call them in. I hear they are really tricky and not as easy as it may seem to kill. but i'll give it my best shot and hopefully I'll get some kills under my belt. we also have to get rid of some beavers on the old farm, they sure are making a mess with their darn. and those poor trees they are taking down. I don't even recognize the yard anymore. all the nice big trees are gone. gonna use the beavers to bait the bears. so, we won't be going out for those untill it's closer to bear season. I'm getting excited!!!



#2 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 09:00 AM

Coyote hunting is a lot of fun and great practice for deer hunting. Plus possibly saving many small and even big game lives to boot. Yotes do prey on deer fawns and the ocassional mature deer. In some ways it is a little like turkey hunting in the spring where you call and your prey responds and comes to you. Good luck.
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#3 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 01:24 PM

Coyotes have become quite brazen of late, and attacks on humans has even taken place. One young woman was even killed by two coyotes while she was jogging in Nova Scotia last year. Coyotes, unlike timber wolves, appear to have lost their fear of interaction, near humans and and human habitat, so they are fast becoming a hazzard or threat.

Here's a picture a friend of mine sent me showing a couple coyotes on the grounds of the Bruce Nuclear site in Northern Ontario where they chased a whitetailed deer, killed it and were feasting on it:

Posted Image

And coyotes are somewhat like dogs in so far as they sometimes kill other animals unchecked just for the sport and not just for self preservation. They can do unbelievable harm to a deer herd in the winter when deer are having a hard time looking for scarce browse and struggling in deep snow. Governments are doing little to actually promote management of the overpopulated coyotes. Hunting / trapping is the one tool that remains foremost in keeping the numbers anywhere in check.

And with regards to your comments about beavers and the damage they do, I recall a friend of mine who lives rurally and beside a small river. A few years ago he told another friend (a trapper) that he had some beavers swimming on the river near his house. The trapper immediately told him he should get rid of those "buck-toothed" rhodents before they did any damage to his property. My buddy responded by saying, "Oh no my wife and I like to see the wildlife and watching the nice fury beavers gives us some pleasure". A week later and the beavers were on the guy's lawn chewing down a bunch of trees that he and his wife had bought and planted a couple years ealier. Next thing you know, my wildlife loving buddy was out in his yard with a shotgun and rifle! End of beaver problem. We nick-named him "Bandelaro Bob"! :rofl:

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#4 TerryfromAR

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 06:09 PM

Shrapnal If you're going after 'yotes, might I suggest a .223, a .204, a .177, a .22 magnum, or even a .22 LR..... these are all great flat shooting rifles that have the speed to take out the tricky little devils. I hope ya'll bag ya'lls limit every time ya'll go out. :)
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#5 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 16 March 2011 - 08:59 PM

I don't know for sure but as far west as you are you most likely have the western coyote. These are noticably smaller than the kind we have here. Out west a yote will weigh maybe 30 lbs or a little more. Around the east the same age yote will possibly go 40 or more pounds. I just read an article that confirms an argument of very long standing. Using dna from many coyotes they were able to confirm that the size difference is absolutely not from a dog coyote mix as only one coyote exhibited this in the dna. What did surface was a wolf coyote mix that is atributed to the eastern coyotes larger size. So there is a bit of coyote history.
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#6 Shrapnal

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 08:49 AM

Thx for replying geoff/tbow. tht's kind of scary that coyotes are losing their fear. and yeah, those dang beavers gotta go!!! they don't care what trees they bring down.

Thx for the caliber suggestions, terry. those yotes are going dooowwwwwnnnnnnnn. lol :boone:

interesting, PA. I would of thought the west had larger coyotes then the east. are there more wolves in the east as well?

#7 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 09:22 AM

The Article said that those coyotes that came directly from the west were about the same as those in the west but many of our eastern coyotes actually came from the north most likely because of several major rivers. Those coyotes traveled north into canada and encountered wolves. Most of the time wolves will kill a coyote but the dna evidence showed that at least a few had mated with them and produced a little larger animal and they then migrated to the south and of course have also mixed with the few coming from the west. They still look exactly like a coyote but are a bit larger than our western yotes.
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#8 Geoff / TBow

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Posted 17 March 2011 - 01:05 PM

I can only refer to Ontario with regards to coyotes vs wolves. Southern Ontario is predominantly populated with coyotes as opposed to wolves. To spot a timber wolf in southern Ontario is a rare event. And the reverse is true of northen Ontario. The predominant predator is timber wolves, with few coyotes. I had heard of locals referring to resident coyotes sometimes as coydogs, drawing assumptions that coyotes had interbred with domestic dogs. I believe this assumption was based on peoples' attempts at trying to explain the lack of fear for humans by the wily canines. However PA's info with regards to hard fact DNA information would appear to dispell that belief and I would tend to lean that way as well.

There was a documentary on TV last year with regards to the coyote and discussed how wide ranged its territory was throughout north and south america. It also mentioned how prolific it was and how adaptable it had become to the encroachment of mankind into what had traditionally been the boondocks. Coyotes will flourish as easily in an urban environment as they will in a small game rich wooded locale.

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Edited by Geoff / TBow, 18 March 2011 - 07:15 PM.

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#9 Fossil

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 04:38 PM

Here is a pic of one day of yote hunting in North Dakota where I use to live-so thick in that area......Thats one day hunt with 8 guys....
I shot a 220-Swift when dog hunting...............

Posted Image

Edited by Fossil, 27 March 2011 - 04:39 PM.

Posted Image




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#10 Jeremiah

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Posted 27 March 2011 - 10:09 PM

I dig the 22-250 for a dedicated 'yote rifle. But, it's mostly personal preference. (I don't know anyone that's eating them and not many even bother to mess with the pelts anymore either to need to worry about "overkill". So, use an elephant gun for all I care.)

Foss... dang. That pic is both cool and scary.
Cool to see that many taken out of circulation. :thumbsup:
Scary to think there were that many to begin with. (Probably only scratched the surface too.):unsure:

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#11 Shrapnal

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 08:58 AM

hey there fossil, why have you got them hanging there, what do you do with them? or was it just to take a picture?

nice days' work!!! did you call them in?

#12 Fossil

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Posted 28 March 2011 - 09:47 AM

hey there fossil, why have you got them hanging there, what do you do with them? or was it just to take a picture?

nice days' work!!! did you call them in?



We have a contest every year,usually in Jan. Mostly 5 or 6 groups of two people.Some call,some just know where the yotes are at..The reason for hanging them is for braggin'-LOL
Always a feed on after the days hunt.....I missed last season,but they said over 100 yotes were seen in a 8 hour period in a 30 mile radius!
I have another pic somewhere,I'll hook it up too...............I've seen 5 or 6 yotes running in packs in ND,so dang thick!
Posted Image




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#13 Oletrapper

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 02:02 PM

I agree Terry, My favorite is my Remington 222. Great even out to 200 yds. I bought a FoxPro last year and the yotes don't have a chance. Set it out, get back about 100 yds, hit the remote to turn it on and then get ready to rock and roll. The foxbang feature has allowed me to score 2 doubles on three different stands. The only good coyote is a dead coyote! The limit here in KY is all you can kill. OT

Shrapnal If you're going after 'yotes, might I suggest a .223, a .204, a .177, a .22 magnum, or even a .22 LR..... these are all great flat shooting rifles that have the speed to take out the tricky little devils. I hope ya'll bag ya'lls limit every time ya'll go out. :)



#14 Oletrapper

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 02:06 PM

Geoff, You left out young calves. Had a neighbor lose 3 earlier this year. I put a hurtin on the yotes for him. No trouble since. OT

Coyotes have become quite brazen of late, and attacks on humans has even taken place. One young woman was even killed by two coyotes while she was jogging in Nova Scotia last year. Coyotes, unlike timber wolves, appear to have lost their fear of interaction, near humans and and human habitat, so they are fast becoming a hazzard or threat.

Here's a picture a friend of mine sent me showing a couple coyotes on the grounds of the Bruce Nuclear site in Northern Ontario where they chased a whitetailed deer, killed it and were feasting on it:

Posted Image

And coyotes are somewhat like dogs in so far as they sometimes kill other animals unchecked just for the sport and not just for self preservation. They can do unbelievable harm to a deer herd in the winter when deer are having a hard time looking for scarce browse and struggling in deep snow. Governments are doing little to actually promote management of the overpopulated coyotes. Hunting / trapping is the one tool that remains foremost in keeping the numbers anywhere in check.

And with regards to your comments about beavers and the damage they do, I recall a friend of mine who lives rurally and beside a small river. A few years ago he told another friend (a trapper) that he had some beavers swimming on the river near his house. The trapper immediately told him he should get rid of those "buck-toothed" rhodents before they did any damage to his property. My buddy responded by saying, "Oh no my wife and I like to see the wildlife and watching the nice fury beavers gives us some pleasure". A week later and the beavers were on the guy's lawn chewing down a bunch of trees that he and his wife had bought and planted a couple years ealier. Next thing you know, my wildlife loving buddy was out in his yard with a shotgun and rifle! End of beaver problem. We nick-named him "Bandelaro Bob"! :rofl:

Geoff / TBow



#15 Oletrapper

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 02:09 PM

What a beautyful sight. Wish their hides brought more on the market though. OT

Here is a pic of one day of yote hunting in North Dakota where I use to live-so thick in that area......Thats one day hunt with 8 guys....
I shot a 220-Swift when dog hunting...............

Posted Image






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