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#1 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 06:46 PM

Yesterday the temps here got up to 77 degrees and this morning the temp was 40 but clear. The moon was just going down so it was cold but pretty. So pretty that the turkeys must have slept in because we did not hear one. We did see where they were digging in the corner of the corn field in the past day or so. Wouldn't you know it I get home and the turkeys were in the cornfield out back.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 19 March 2011 - 06:50 PM.

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#2 Eric

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 06:41 AM

And we also seen 3 deer feeding in a cornfield long after light but a nice morning none the less.
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#3 Leo

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 10:15 AM

I take more interest in seeing the birds than anything else scouting. Primary importance to me is whether or not they are still in winter flocks. My strategies for hunting them are different when then are still flocked versus when the flocks break up.

Finding the flocks also outlines some favored gathering and feeding areas. These areas often remain important even after the flocks disperse. Some of these areas become strut zones that are frequently visited by gobblers during the day. Finding roost sites is important for the first 1 1/2hrs of the turkey hunting day. If you want to hunt longer than the first 1 1/2 hours of the day. Find some favorite day time spots the birds are using.

Believe me, successful before season scouting requires using your eyes much more than your ears during the day. Good binoculars really help. Scout the times of the day you plan to hunt and make note of when you see birds in certain spots. That's when and where you need to hunt.

Do this and you'll spend more time actually hunting birds versus pushing them around trying to get one to shock gobble.
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#4 PA RIDGE RUNNER

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 03:29 PM

I agree Leo that it is important to know where the birds want to go. All we wanted to know on this outing is finding some roost sites as they are now. Our season does not come in till the very end of April and things may well change till then. We like to start out hunt in the dark of early morning so like to know where the gobblers are roosting and trying to work one off the roost. I will admit that most of my birds have come a bit later in the morning once the birds become active in fields and strut zones but cannot resist trying to close in on one on the roost.
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