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Taurus Revolver In .480 Rugar


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#1 mudduck

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:13 AM

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Edited by mudduck, 27 April 2012 - 12:44 PM.


#2 mudduck

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:15 AM

Our newest addition to the line-up. Will shoot it this Sunday, weather permitting. I love these big handguns,lol

#3 Jeremiah

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Posted 27 April 2012 - 04:14 PM

I'm not a big fan of Taurus overall. (Admittedly, likely an unfair assessment on my part based upon one bad experience. But, oh well.)
I definitely like big wheel guns though and give Taurus credit for the Raging Bull series. Those are what I think of when I think hunting revolvers.

Hey, what's up with the .480 though? All three models Taurus used to offer are discontinued?

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#4 mudduck

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Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:13 AM

I think an overall lack of popularity of the .480 is responsible for that. Once one steps "past" the .44 mag (while not the largest revover anymore, it is still likely to be the most practical), you have the .454 casull, the .475 Linebaugh, .460 S&W., the .500S&W,etc. The .480 does nothing that these other chamberings can't do. Also, at over 2 dollars per round, unless one re-loads, a day at the range isn't practical for most. My own personal opinon is that these large caliburs appeal to a very small niche market, Those very very dedicated to hunting very large game with handguns, or those(like me) who just want to make some noise with a big handgun,lol. Got this gun used from a guy who ran 2 boxes of ammo through it, and didn't like it, So ended up with a .480 Ragin Bull at a great price

#5 cayugad

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 08:40 AM

One problem I saw in people and large bore revolvers is lack of control. I have a friend who is a bear guide. For years he carried a Ruger Security Six in .357 magnum as protection when baiting. And finally one year he had to use it. He emptied all six into a blackie at point blank range and killed it. The bear was guarding a bait station and was not pleased that he came up out of no where onto it. If memory serves me, four of them shots he made, were very well placed shots. But it really messed with his head, as he was sure he was under powdered. Sure enough the next year he comes in with a .454 casull in a Taurus line of revolver. And he was showing it off to us, and we were impressed with the balance of the revolver and especially the caliber (I carried a Ruger Redhawk .44 mag). A couple weeks later he comes to me and asks me to shoot his revolver. So I did, and it was a nice shooting revolver. He then tells me... he can't hit anything with the thing. I watch him shoot and sure enough he's flinching like mad. Too much gun for him. So I try to convince him that at close range in a pressure situation, he will do fine. But he sells it a couple weeks later and gets a .44 magnum and then loads that down to a .44 special cartridge. He still carries that as far as I know.

Do you think people can get too big of a gun? Remember the monster hog that a kid shot with a .500 S&W a few years back. And he'd shot like nine times at it. Turns out it was a farm raised hog anyway. But the point is.. when I saw the picture of that kid with that ,500 S&W I even said... how could that kid have shot that revolver?
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#6 mudduck

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 02:33 PM

Shot the .480 today, 50 rds. Shot well at 25yds, trigger pull was nice, recoil

about like .44 mag. Heavy handgun, but no real "shock and awe" factor, unlike the .50AE or .500 S&W. Will take this pistol hunting. A question was asked about a handgun being "too big". After spending a number of hours at the range and watching people shoot handguns, my answer is YES!!! Contrary to popular belief, most people do not shoot ANY handgun real well, and these high capacity mags really encourage the "spray and pray" shooting form. I fully understand why the innocent bystander standing next to the intended target gets shot. Big Bore handguns can also enhance the "flinch" factor, as evidenced by someone pulling the trigger on an empty chamber, and the gun "jumps" skyward,lol. We could also get into ballistics, and why one would or should take a short range weapon and try to get rifle performance out of it, but that could be another post,lol

#7 Jeremiah

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Posted 29 April 2012 - 08:46 PM

I'd agree that folks can definitely over-gun themselves. I have the interesting perspective of having basically lived two lives, if you will. I am 6'2" and at one time weighed well over 300 lbs. I currently weigh 180 lbs. soaking wet. When I was a "big boy", it seemed that I just absorbed large calibers without a problem. Now, a .44 is definitely the biggest revolver I would even consider actually hunting with. (Just messin' around at the range... I'll shoot anything at least once. lol) I can actually feel my entire body being moved about now whereas it just didn't happen before. Perhaps it is also the arthritis involvement, but my hands/wrists seem to take more of the punishment now and just don't like it one bit.

Different guns for different folks. I feel everything from physical stature to shooting form and mechanics all play a roll and it seems most folks just go into it saying, "If my buddy can shoot it, so can I.", as if it's just a macho thing, without even actually trying to find their best choice.

Sorry to hear you weren't "flame throwing" with this one, Jeff. Still sounds like it would be a fun gun at the range.

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