Jump to content


Photo

Muzzel loader kits


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 GP@AZ

GP@AZ

    Always Here

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 31 July 2006 - 07:28 PM

Phil what tips do you have for making the kits a better muzzleloader?
I am having problems with the hammer not firing the cap.

#2 Phil

Phil

    Never Logs Off

  • Authors
  • 2,379 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 01 August 2006 - 02:41 AM

My kit was a cheap Hopkins & Allen kit that had too soft of a frizzen. The late William Kennedy lived just a few miles away and hardened the frizzen for me. He also made some adjustments to the hammer angle to increase the length of contact between the flint & frizzen. The kits have come a long way since I bought mine(26 yrs ago). Try several different flints to achieve the best spark. My lock seems to like small english flints the best....but it's a small lock assembly! I'm sure Cayugad might be a help for this. :yes:

* :lol: :ermm: I just reread your post....duh..flintlocks don't use caps....I'm okay, really...it's just early. I don't own a Percussion rifle so I know Cay/ Larry/Paul are better resources of the info that may help ya....sorry :wacko:

Edited by Phil, 01 August 2006 - 02:45 AM.

Posted Image

#3 Larry $

Larry $

    Totally Addicted

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,449 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 01 August 2006 - 09:02 AM

My Lyman does not like the CCI caps for some reason. I have about a 15% failure rate when using them. I have not heard of anyone else having this problem. I switched to a German magnum cap that comes in a red plastic "can" (can't remember the name) and they are working great for me. Maybe try a couple different kinds of caps before condemning the lock? :huh:

We had some friends over for a day of shooting this past Saturday and we put over 40 lead balls down range with old Belcher. That rifle is just too much fun and made a couple of converts to boot. :)
Elk: it's what's for dinner!

#4 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 01 August 2006 - 07:27 PM

Ok Ok I am here I have been thinking thats all. If I were trouble shooting a sidelock percussion rifle the first thing I would do is make sure the hammer is traveling all the way down to the nipple. If it isn't hitting the nipple or is just bumping it check the hammer to be sure that where it pivots it is not contacting the wood. I would also remove the lock from the rifle and check the spring that operates the hammer for correct position and that it is not binding in the stock or being pinched by wood anywhere.

If that was not the problem and the hammer was traveling all the way to the top of the nipple then I would take the nipple out and check it to be sure it was open and clear. To be sure I would get another nipple and try it. I have always had pretty good luck with the Remington caps. I dont recall that any failed to fire. I did get a hangfire on the biggest buck I ever shot at but that was most likely my fault for not cleaning the nipple and drum area very well.

Now if you have already done all that and are still having problems I will have to think some more.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#5 GP@AZ

GP@AZ

    Always Here

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 01 August 2006 - 08:58 PM

Phill you where not asleep, I had asked a general question with another one following. The question was open ended as to give us any suggestions. And Thank you for that answer. I had also asked about caps secondly.

OK no I am using a #10 cap dry firing with a cap only no powder the cap finally fires after about three to four hits. I have checked the hammer angle, the wood from the stock, the stroke of the hammer on the nipple. The kit says to use a # 10 cap, I am wondering if I should try a # 11 cap. It is a hand gun also. but the same principles apply correct.

I had actually built the gun over twenty five years ago. I wasn't very happy with my craftsmanship. I ordered a new stock and started over. Looks much better now. I have never fired it, but I want to.

#6 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 August 2006 - 07:13 AM

I am presuming it is a single shot pistol hand gun. I recall somewhere reading that the #10 cap is intended for handguns and the #11 for rifles. If the hammer is striking the nipple but not firing the cap then in my mind there can be only a couple of explanations. 1 the hammer is not hitting with enough force or 2 the caps are not good.
If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#7 Phil

Phil

    Never Logs Off

  • Authors
  • 2,379 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 August 2006 - 08:16 AM

Here's a tip from Bill's class.
Take a small kerosene lamp and light it , keeping the wick height low so it smokes a little. Pass the underside of the barrel through the smoke until it's got a light coating of black residue on it. Set the barrel straight down in the stock and press frimly to seat it. Lift the barrel back out and inspect the stock channel. Anywhere you see black marks from the barrel contacting the stock you'll need to gently chisel out the wood ...this removes pressure spots on the barrel. Repeat this procedure until you end up with a uniform "speckling pattern" the length of the barrel channel indicating a very even channel. Now sand channel until smooth and you should be able to slide a dollar bill back & forth at various spots along the barrel when it's seated. I like a "Browned" barrel more than a "Blued" one but that's just my taste ! ;)
Posted Image

#8 PA RIDGE RUNNER

PA RIDGE RUNNER

    Life Member

  • Authors
  • 5,702 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 02 August 2006 - 11:38 AM

I stopped by my local sportings good store this morning and asked the manager what in addition to my already mentioned possible fixes that your problem could be. He mentioned something I had not thought of. Check to see if the cap is fitting fully down over the nipple. He said that could be your problem if the cap is not fully seated all the way down the nipple the hammer may have to seat it before it fires. The cap should fit snug but not so tight so as to require excessive force to seat. A new nipple would most likely fix that. If you do go to buy a new nipple, take the old one along as there are a few different threads on them.

Phil I use a plain old candle to blacken an object. I just hold it in the flame but very near the top of it will produce an adequate amount of lamp black to get the job done too. I use a candle because I have no access to a kerosene lamp.

Edited by PA RIDGE RUNNER, 02 August 2006 - 11:43 AM.

If God had a refrigerator would your picture be on it.
Remember the Ark was built by amateurs, the titanic by professionals.

#9 Spirithawk

Spirithawk

    Never Logs Off

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,343 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 August 2006 - 09:07 AM

I'd be willing to bet that Paul is right. That's the first thing that came to my mind. I have an 1860 Colt Old Army and when I put caps on it I have to lower the hammer softly down on each one and apply a little pressure to seat the cap firmly. If I don't they won't seat all the way down and will missfire more often than not. As to #10 versus #11 I've always used #11's on all of my BP handguns and never had a real problem at all. I also had a T/C Renegade that was the same way. Took more pressure than my bare thumb could manage to seat the caps. I replaced the nipple, end of story, problem solved. Also, the caps Larry is talking about I believe are called Dynomark, or something real similar, and are the hottest firing caps on the market.

Edited by Spirithawk, 03 August 2006 - 09:11 AM.


#10 cayugad

cayugad

    Hunting Resource

  • Moderators
  • 881 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 03 August 2006 - 09:21 PM

Phil what tips do you have for making the kits a better muzzleloader?
I am having problems with the hammer not firing the cap.

There are a couple things you can do to make the kit fire better. I am guessing this is a traditional single shot kentucky, or trapper type model hand gun a.k.a. horse pistol. They do require a #10 cap because of the size of the nipple.

Make sure the cap is sitting down as far as possible on the nipple. Pick the nipple between loading as they will often clog up. A simple small piece of guitar string will make an excellent nipple pick for you. Make sure you clean the snail and fire channel by firing a couple caps prior to loading. Also be sure to swab the barrel of the pistol clean with an alcohol patch. You want that breech clean and dry for the most efficient ignition.

Check to make sure the hammer is striking the nipple square. Sometimes they are a little off center. If they are you will get misfires. The hammer can be bent a little if the hammer is off, just make small adjustments at a time.

Also the brand of cap will make a big difference. Unfortunately the most popular #10 cap is Remington. Not my favorite mind you, but they work. Perhaps a RWS 1075 wil work but you might have to sightly bend the cap closed so it sits tight on the nipple.

Last use Goex 3f as your powder. Goex 3f is the best powder out there for ignition. Even a minor flash will set it off quickly and evenly...
"Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, a total wreck with a big smile on your face."




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users